Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Solve this & You'll Find A Hidden Story!

Like life, I love life; people ask me how life's going, I say silly things like long live the golden spiral of love, whereby one is ensnared by a woman's clutches and goes from simply enjoying the view to falling fast from the garden of eden—I kid, I kid—first the Apple, now this, as I tell my better half. 
I always look out the window, here in Seattle, and see if there's rain. Lately, however, there's been an incessant fog creeping in and snuffing out the lights. Largely a result of the sound and cold air, it's a little odd that it doesn't add that much ambience to the city. Then, I walk towards some place where I can get some actual work done. At attention, I meander the stacks of the library. At times it can endow me with the impetus to write. And, boy oh boy, does them stories flow forth when looking at the mix of humanity at the library. Of course one day I was lumped in with people who were down and out. My ego took a large hit that day, just imagine if you thought you attained even a little success, then realized you were fooling no one. Well that's when I got the idea for this riddle, not that more than a handful of people read this blog, really, but just to try something new. Because you should know that I've been reading about machine learning programs that can basically create new Van Goghs out of nothing and fools even the best experts we have.

So what then does that leave me with when the machine learning program comes along and fools even the most discerning of literary critics (not that it should be that hard)? So what will I do, old friend, besides sad attempts to add the physical world into my stories. 





Rules: 
(Unfortunately this is only Available to those in Seattle, and with access to Seattle's Central Library. Note that, if you're half way to figuring this out, the Space Needle doesn't count). 



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Monday, December 4, 2017

100,000 Views!


Not necessarily readers. Still, thank you for coming over and reading what I'm putting out there. These are small numbers for many people, but decent ones for me. So thanks again and I should have the latest book links out for you. Until then, you can see what's on here, or go to another website (medium or itscomplicated.vet) where I have added more work.



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Sunday, December 3, 2017

Short video Out

Well, as per the usual pieces out at itscomplicated.vet, I have a short video below. It's a story from 1000001 American Nights and well worth the view. Here's the paperback.


https://youtu.be/CGGeqMmdXlc

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Saturday, November 25, 2017

Best Books of 2017

Once again, in keeping up with the tradition of best books of the year (books read by me, not published—I don't care about books du jour) I'm going to give a list of the best books of 2017:

Citizen by Rankine is a beautiful mix of poetry and thoughts that gives some more outlines to the current chaotic zeitgeist we all feel but perhaps don't understand.

Kolyma Tales by Shalamov. Here's a solid collection of stories on the gulags that killed millions. Worth a look because looking into the eye of evil is never easy. And when bureaucratic it's especially interesting.

White Walls by Tolstaya. Okay, so I like Russian lit. Don't think I had any influence on our election, it's just that their writers are damned good at speaking to the humanity in us all. Not as brutal as Kolyma, this is still something worth reading through, if only for her easy mix of fantastical and realism.

Egil's Saga is m first Icelandic Saga and I love it. Amoral tellings of the past are always worth a glance, IMO. Sure I actually managed to visit the island, and that resulted in a story or two, but it's really a worthwhile saga, even if it doesn't follow your modern plot or even idea of what's right or wrong.

The Collected Stories by Singer. So I like collection of short stories, sue me. Hell, I like anthologies even more (you know, a mix of great shorts, how is this not a bigger thing), but I won't add any for now. So read this collection of shorts (then read my collection which is pretty sweet too). 

Honorable Mention:

October: about the Russian revolution. A quick read and pretty comprehensive. There's also the list at the end that tells you what happened to them. "Executed by Stalin" being the main choice or lack thereof.

 So check these books out today!


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Thursday, November 9, 2017

More stories elsewhere

I've pointed out some other places (Medium being the big one) but here's a short story, and here's something I did concerning Baldwin's Stranger in the Village and the global village today. Check them out and let me know what you're thinking.



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